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Senior MLBAM Exec Dinn Mann Talks New Media PDF Print E-mail
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Written by The Staff   
Thursday, 15 March 2007 01:24

MLBIn an interesting roundtable discussion with MLB Advanced Media Exec VP & Editor-in-Chief Dinn Mann, Dan Courtemanche, svp-marketing and communications, MLS; Dick Glover, vp-new media and broadcasting, NASCAR; and Steve Hellmuth, svp-operations and technology, NBA Entertainment by Brandweek, the topic of new media (Internet, smart phones, etc) was the topic. Here are some excerpts from Dinn:

  • On the potential of new media - You cannot fight [technology] and you have to make not only your content available but your brand—your entire experience—available. Fans expect to be able to engage, to feel like they can visit the stadium at any moment and there's always a game going on, whether a classic game or current game or previewing a future game. People expect this on a 24/7 basis, year-round. A venue for a sporting event is still the best place to go and experience that event. But to bring as much of that experience as you possibly can through digital media is vital. It's really up to the intellectual property owner to make his content available and make his experience translatable into this new media space. And the word "new" should be dropped from this discussion. It's not new anymore, it's just media. It's fun to try to expand the business and not treat the Internet as merely an extension but as an actual part of the core business.
  • On how you ensure pay-for content delivery, such as Extra Innings doesn't hurt your network broadcast - All baseball games are available online but we still black them out to honor the TV restrictions. We work with television partners and they've gotten a lot more open-minded in many cases about experimenting. The way of the world is to make the content available as readily as possible. People expect to see it. As soon as mobile networks improve a little bit more, people will expect to see that material on their phones.
  • On deals such as NBA's YouTube partnership and whether deals like these offer some control over user-generated content - You don't want to go around sending fans cease-and-desist letters; that's a rather preposterous notion. The key is a strategy to make the content available. We all know you have to get a thicker skin in today's world because media is so prevalent. Then there's the issue of whether the content looks like it was officially sanctioned, or is something you're making available because you recognize the universe of fans [that] wants to participate? For example, there's no reason you shouldn't have "sports-aoke," where people routinely are recalling their version of something that just happened in a game. The important thing is not to fight it; it's to help enable it and optimize it.
 
 
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